Avoid Costly Downtime With Our Preventative Maintenance Checklist

Avoid Costly Downtime With Our Preventative Maintenance Checklist

All maintenance activities, such as machine servicing, equipment inspection, or part replacement problems executed as part of a scheduled plan instead of an immediate response to an issue, are considered preventative maintenance. The goal of preventative maintenance is to recognize components of equipment that are breaking or wearing out and either replacing or fixing them before they fail. A successful preventative maintenance program will help prevent work stoppages and prolong the life of the equipment.

Creating a preventative maintenance plan will yield positive results for businesses. It can help enhance equipment operation, increase the quality of parts and reduce downtime. However, making a preventative maintenance schedule work requires time and planning. Data needs to be gathered and analyzed, tasks must be ranked and prioritized, and total cost needs to be considered.

Preventative maintenance breakdown

According to TWI, one of the world’s foremost independent research and technology organizations, generally speaking, there are three types of preventative maintenance tasks:According to TWI, one of the world’s foremost independent research and technology organizations, generally speaking, there are three types of preventative maintenance tasks:
Mandatory / Non-Mandatory

Mandatory / Non-Mandatory

Mandatory tasks are those that must be performed as soon as they are due and will often include safety-critical checks. Non-mandatory tasks are still important but can be delayed without resulting in a critical failure or performance reduction.

Pyramiding / Non-Pyramiding

Pyramiding / Non-Pyramiding

Pyramiding tasks occur when maintenance is set for a due date but is not completed and overlaps with a later scheduled maintenance. In this instance, should a new PM task become due, the previous one is canceled.

Inspection and Task-Oriented

Inspection and Task-Oriented

Inspection tasks require checks to be made before the results are turned into work orders for planned maintenance to fix any problems that have been discovered.

Businesses must also consider how and if they will perform these tasks. There are three components to take into account when planning:
  • Engineering: Are the correct tasks included in the preventative maintenance plan? Are frequency and the maintenance schedule appropriate for identifying and remedying critical wear and tear?
  • Economic: Is it worth the financial commitment to perform the task? Does it cost less to replace the part rather than maintain it?
  • People-Psychological: Are personnel correctly trained to perform the tasks with detail in mind?
All aspects of the preventative maintenance program should be clearly defined and documented to ensure tasks are completed on time and each piece of equipment is looked after. Updates and reviews should regularly happen to ensure the plan works as the company grows or changes.

What goes into a preventative maintenance checklist?

Each business will require a checklist customized to its industry and operations. However, a general list of equipment commonly needing repair and replacement is a solid place to start:

fresh
Exterior maintenance
Interior maintenance
Lighting
HVAC
Plumbing
Safety

The bottom line: the power of preventive maintenance

Preventive maintenance is systematic, planned maintenance that is planned according to usage or time-based triggers. The purpose of preventative maintenance is to reduce the probability of equipment breakdowns. There are many situations in which preventive is the best maintenance approach to use. It is much easier to carry out a preventative maintenance strategy with a well-organized checklist. .